Chocolate Chip Cookie Recipe


choc-chip-cookiesI recieved an email from a friend yesterday, one of those that was sent to a whole bunch of people with the subject “Cookie Recipe from Woolies”. Most of these types of emails I can quickly see are just the usual spam being forwarded but something about this one intrigued me, a little – cookies!

It goes on about a woman who went to Woolies for lunch and tried their chocolate chip cookies as a dessert and enjoyed them so much that she asked for the recipe, at a price of course.

The recipe itself looks genuine enough but the two words that made me realise it was another one of those hoax emails were: “true story” – yeah I’m a little cynical but mostly with stuff I get sent/find on the Internet since I’ve seen most of it as I’ve been on the Internet for more than 16 years now.

I did a little digging on my favourite myth/legend busting website Snopes.com and found this. The interesting thing is that the myth supercedes the advent of the Internet. In fact the myth is more than 50 years old.

Though its present incarnation casts Neiman-Marcus as the bad guy, this legend has been around for at least 50 years, and it’s been told of various companies (and various confections) during its long history. Here’s a fine example from a 1948 cookbook, Massachusetts Cooking Rules, Old and New, which lists not only the recipe for “$25 Fudge Cake” but also gives the following explanation for the name:
This friend had to pay $25 upon the receipt of the recipe from the chef of one of the railroads. She had asked for the recipe while eating on a train. The chef gladly sent it to her, together with a bill for $25, which her attorney said she had to pay. She then gave the recipe to all her friends, hoping they would get some pleasure from it.

Though its present incarnation casts Neiman-Marcus as the bad guy, this legend has been around for at least 50 years, and it’s been told of various companies (and various confections) during its long history. Here’s a fine example from a 1948 cookbook, Massachusetts Cooking Rules, Old and New, which lists not only the recipe for “$25 Fudge Cake” but also gives the following explanation for the name:

This friend had to pay $25 upon the receipt of the recipe from the chef of one of the railroads. She had asked for the recipe while eating on a train. The chef gladly sent it to her, together with a bill for $25, which her attorney said she had to pay. She then gave the recipe to all her friends, hoping they would get some pleasure from it. – source Snopes.com

The American version of the myth states the recipe comes from Neiman Marcus. To put an end to the myth that it originated from them they published the recipe for their line of chocolate cookies for free on their website for everyone to take home and try out for themselves.

I’ve not tried the recipe myself yet but I’m keen to try it out. Have you or know someone that has? What are the cookies like – let me know.

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